What Genre Am I?

My first series was a time-slip contemporary/historical with romantic elements. My next novel was sort of a niche Southern fiction/small town/humor with romantic elements. I think some of my initial audience was drawn to the immersive Civil War themes of the Torn Asunder Series, with some happening to fall in love with the modern characters along the way.

There is no question that, for marketing purposes, it would have been great for my next project to sort of resemble my previous series in some tangible way, in order to build on the following in that direction. I was aware of that and actually made the conscious decision not to do that.

I am independently published, and currently not trying to be published traditionally. One of the great advantages of that is literary freedom. I have observed authors propelled in a single direction, only much later in their careers to try to change directions, and their audience is confused and even sometimes angry or let down. My group and I made the decision to go ahead and rip off that Band-Aid so there wouldn’t be any expectations that would be a cap on creativity or authenticity of what I am wanting to put out there in the moment.

But obviously, that’s a lot of trust to request from your readers. Some of my Torn Asunder readers who were historical fiction-oriented didn’t translate to Thank God for Mississippi, and that’s okay. Thank God for Misssissippi has a sort of Southern/small town/humor following that is separate that won’t necessarily always translate into my later works.

Right now, I’ve got in the pipeline a few books that are very different: one being a Southern contemporary with a historical tie-in through letters that is quite muted compared with Thank God for Mississippi, another set in 1840s Virginia, and another being a post-Civil War romance quite different in tone from Torn Asunder.

There are two threads to what I write: Southern and romantic. I’m not prepared even to always say Southern (although that will be the bulk), but I do think romantic will always be key because that is what propels me as a writer. So I can’t promise anything in the way of precise consistency in genre, theme, decade, or mood.

But I do promise you that you will have an enjoyable, page-turning book in your hands, every time. And I’m hoping readers make that leap with me.

Q&A: Thank God for Mississippi

Hi Readers! I am excited to share the official Q&A for Thank God for Mississippi with you! I always open these to readers and anyone with an interest. We have some great questions, and I categorized them by topic. Starting off, there are questions about the writer (moi!), followed by questions about TGFM itself, which lead into questions about small town and Southern life, Southern literature in general—and then we bring it back to the book. The questions were very wide-ranging this time, but I think they’re all pertinent and related. Enjoy!

Q: What is your favorite part of writing?

A: I think…the storytelling. I love the process of sparking an idea, then considering how to tell it in a way that is effective, then the feeling of getting it right (if I do), and then sharing that and having readers connect with it… I love it!

Q: What is your least favorite part of writing?

A: The nuts and bolts stuff. The actual writing at the keyboard is not necessarily the most fun part, but it’s fine as long as the story is going well. But if something isn’t working, it can be very frustrating. I have always wished I could mentally beam the story out of my head onto the paper, because sometimes you can hit it right easily, but sometimes it takes a lot of work and stress to get it right, and occasionally you never can fully replicate what you had in mind. I also very much dislike editing, but I do a lot of it before it ever goes out to first readers and then a lot after they give feedback. Totally necessary, but not necessarily the fun part!

Q: Do you have any tips for new writers?

A: Maybe not tips, because I truly think every writer’s process is different. But I can tell you my process! I usually formulate the ideas almost totally in my head. I have a sort of “Go” button in my mind when I know the story is complete enough to actually put pen to paper, so to speak. If I outline, I only do so minimally, with a handful of words to serve as my guide for plot points so I don’t forget any of the ideas. There are usually about 10-12 scenes that I have in mind that serve as a sort of mental outline. In between them is not just blank; there is a muddier sort of impression/feeling of what’s supposed to be happening that I need to recreate. When I sit down to write, I usually do best if I can have days and hours for huge writing binges. The creative juices and stories flow most naturally for me that way.

Q: Do you send reviewers copies of books in exchange for reviews or participate in any books-for-free programs like NetGalley?

A: No (thanks for asking!). I’m committed to earning organic reviews from spontaneous readers because I think that leads to the most honest reviews.

Q: What is your favorite genre?

A: Probably Regency. I had always loved Jane Austen (the movies most of all), and then Julie Klassen came onto the stage, and I devoured her books at the end of high school and beginning of college. I discovered Georgette Heyer my freshman year of college. I remember so many happy evenings spent consuming her prolific collection, generally while also consuming Zaxby’s. 😂

Q: Is there a playlist for TGFM?

A: Yes! The book is set in Middle Tennessee, so music is a huge inspiration for the book. I am going to release the playlist on the blog in just a few days.

Q: Tell me about the title!

A: Well, first the book is set in Tennessee, not Mississippi. My main character’s name is Mississippi, and there is also an inside joke that some in the South will already recognize, and you can find out what it is by reading the book!

Q: Why Tennessee?

A: I originally began to set TGFM in Alabama to give myself mental space for creativity, since I live in Tennessee. But then the storyline just got very realistic, and I realized that, similar as the cultures of the two states are, there could be some differences. If I was going to get so involved, I might as well know I was going to get it spot on. Also, I happened to think: why shouldn’t Tennessee get some airtime? 😂 Alabama seems to show up a lot more in movies. So I thought: let’s just get really close to home here and speak from true experience.

Q: What genre(s) would you put TGFM in?

A: Probably most prominently contemporary romance. Thank God for Mississippi is a little hard to categorize because the romance element is subtle, and there are also hints of women’s fiction, mystery, humor, and Southern commentary. I wasn’t sure how TGFM would come down on categorization, but the element most first readers have wanted to discuss was the romantic, so I think that is telling as to categorization. Readers of clean romance will find it comfortably within that wheelhouse. I discuss suitability for young readers, along with faith elements in my books in an earlier Q&A here.

Q: Are your main characters typical of your writing?

A: I actually think you’ll find them quite different from my other books. They really take on a persona all their own. Mississippi is a unique character—very gritty and determined, unafraid to speak her mind but also struggling with the same insecurities we all have. The male lead, too, is a character all his own—kind, sophisticated, and full of joy and humor. 

Q: What is Mississippi’s job in the book?

A: Mississippi was employed both in a professional and personal capacity by Hammondsville’s district attorney, who needed help because he was elderly and blind. She helped out at work with documents, drove him, and lived in a cottage on his property. He passes away, and then she holds over for a little while until the new DA (who happens to be his grandson) can get his feet under him. That’s where the story takes place.

Q: What is the best thing about the book?

A: Mississippi is serving as Joseph’s guide in many ways. So you get a lot of training and commentary on the South, and of course, there are a lot of hijinks along the way. The chemistry between the two main characters works, and so it’s just a really fun ride.

Q: How would you categorize the romance in the book?

A: As you might expect from a Georgette Heyer groupie…subtle, but compelling. 😊

Q: Is Hammondsville a real town or based on a real small town?

Q: Hammondsville is fictional and is not meant to replicate any one town exactly. It’s meant to be a sort of an amalgamation of small Southern towns that would be easily recognizable to people from towns of similar populations. I happen to be from a small Southern town of about Hammondsville’s size, so I did draw on my experiences there and what I know of several other small towns.

Q: What is the best feedback you have gotten from first readers?

A: The comment that has excited me the most is that Mississippi is a strong role model for girls. I hadn’t even thought about that, because she’s so atypical of a heroine. But when I considered it, I thought: yeah, we definitely need more Mississippis in the world!

Q: Do you take on the tougher aspects of living in the South in TGFM?

A: Yes, I think so. I just came at it from a really realistic point of view. My goal is never to paper over anything. I also don’t want to overlook positive aspects. So you get the good with the bad, the funny with the sad, and there’s no shortage of any of it.

Q: You said you strove to strip the book of anything inauthentic. What was the creative process like to write about a small Southern town without any of the cutesy fluff?

A: It was interesting. I have actually never read a book like TGFM that is really authentic to the Southern experience I have lived. They may be out there and I just haven’t come across them. But it felt like there was no rubric. It was different to create a portrait of a small Southern town that would be instantly recognizable to people actually from those towns, without any of the bells and whistles or immediately perceivable charm. So I had to get creative, and somewhere along the way, I realized in this instance creativity just meant digging deep and being real. There will be something comforting to readers about the raw honesty of the whole thing, I think. It just feels like it’s your life, and if they can be the hero or heroine of their own story, you can, too.

Q: What is one small town Southern theme TGFM covers?

A: One is the decision of whether to stay near family and community, or to leave for opportunity and living a more fast-paced life. Everything you have been taught about being prosperous urges you to “get out,” while the ties of home draw you to stay. I think most every young person from a small town has to grapple with that decision at some point in their lives, and make that decision for themselves.

Q: What is the best thing about living in a small town?

A: The community. You are never alone. You don’t have to walk through anything—illness, deprivation, loss—alone. They will be there, and they will bring a casserole. 

Q: What is the worst thing about living in a small town?

A: The community. You are never alone. 😂 There is usually someone “up in your business,” as we say. Privacy is not a given. Gossip is. 

Q: Are you a big fan of the Southern literary greats?

A: Of course, in many ways. But I am very middle-brow. I’ve talked about this before in another Q&A, I think. I recognize the contributions of the greats, I know their worth and powerful impact, and I’m sure in some ways I’m influenced by them—but I don’t particularly enjoy reading them. I find almost anything termed “literature” boring. Of course, I acknowledge that the sole purpose of literature is not to be page-turning. But as a novelist who loves the readable quality that sparks and holds your interest, neither high-brow perfection nor low-brow fluff is going to get me there. So I tend to like my reading a little elevated, but completely grounded to reality. I like real-life stuff, and I do think that is a benefit of Southern writing in general—being hugely grounded. Southern writers are real and raw, almost shockingly so at times, and they have a way of cutting to the chase.

Q: Who are some Southern authors I should read?

A: I may not be the person to ask after the last answer, haha! Some authors I have read are Flannery O’Connor, William Faulkner, Harper Lee, Mark Twain, Toni Morrison (not from the South, but somewhat in the Southern tradition), Margaret Mitchell, Bobbie Ann Mason… There are so many more, of course. If you are a fan of Christian fiction, I’ve really enjoyed Deeanne Gist and some by Tamera Alexander. I know many love Fannie Flagg (I just haven’t gotten to read her yet).

Q: Which Southern stories really stand out to you?

A: The quirky ones (which is most of them!). I’m still scratching my head over A Rose for Emily (Faulkner) and Good Country People (O’Connor). Shiloh (Mason) stays with me. And I think it’s impossible for any Civil War writer to escape the influence of Gone With the Wind (Mitchell), whatever your feelings about its modern resonance or lack thereof.

Q: You talked about how movies often get the South wrong in another Q&A. Are there any Southern movies that get it right?

A: I definitely haven’t watched every Southern film out there, but I can think of a few. Sweet Home Alabama is pretty spot-on. I haven’t watched them recently, but I remember Walk the Line and O Brother, Where Art Thou? really going over well in the South. The accents are pretty horrendous, but there’s a lot that Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil gets right, too. For kids, The Princess and the Frog is great (although I have it on excellent authority that there are scary bits!).

Q: What do you think about stories set in the South, written by non-Southern writers?

A: Sure! I’m very open to that! It will be a greater challenge, probably, to get it right. Part of my Torn Asunder Series was set in New England, and I felt like I had to do my homework doubly. I was a bit nervous I would get something hugely wrong. Of course, if you do get something wrong, it’s not the end of the world, but it can be hard for perfectionists. But as long as you’re willing to take that on, absolutely I think there is room at the table. A number of people have done this quite successfully. 

Q: What are you excited to share about Thank God for Mississippi?

A: The humor. I think we so need that right now.

Q: Anything else we should know about the book?!

A: I will say that we have talked a lot about this being a small town book. But I think a lot about an interview with Ronnie Dunn on CMT or something that I saw a long time ago. I may not get it perfectly right, but the gist of it was: He was talking about his song “Red Dirt Road,” and he said he had a guy come up to him and say, “Man, that’s just like how it was where I grew up.” Dunn said, “Where did you grow up?” And the man answered, “Brooklyn.” So, while I do believe the book will resonate with people who are from small towns, it’s really a book about home, and that is for everybody.

Release Date – Thank God for Mississippi

It’s official! The release date for Thank God for Mississippi is set for March 7, 2022. That means it will be in your hands in a little more than a month! You can go ahead and preorder the Kindle version by following the link below. If you do this, the book will appear in your Kindle on March 7. For paperbacks, you will be able to order the book on March 7 (or maybe a couple of days before, if you watch Amazon closely!).

At the start, my books are always just available at Amazon. Once expanded distribution kicks in, you should be able to find it available for online order at a variety of places. And as always, they are available at KU if you are a member.

Follow the link below! (Note: if the link doesn’t work just yet, go to Amazon, and type: “Thank God for Mississippi Tara Cowan,” and it should take you to it!

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year!

I haven’t been on in a while, and I thought I would drop in to let you know what I’ve been up to as the year draws to a close.

For me, 2021 has been busy. In my day job (as a lawyer), we moved our entire office after renovating a building in a two-month timeframe. Whew! This was the chief reason the blog went dark for a little while. I joked to a relative during that time, “I may have said I was busy before in my life, but I lied. I’ve never been this busy.” 😂  And yet, through the process, and now at its conclusion, we saw God’s provision every step of the way and end the year bursting with gratitude for that and for the people we have the privilege to serve.

I’ve spent a lot of time with my family this year. We’ve had a couple of tough diagnoses and medical emergencies. Those have been hard. But we’ve had some wonderful things, too. Through it all, I am thankful. It’s hard to communicate the extent to which you see God’s love and mercy in the difficult things as well as the beautiful, but it’s there, and I do.

Here at Tea & Rebellion, we have been able to squeeze in some content that I have enjoyed producing. I’ve introduced you to my next book, Thank God for Mississippi, with some fun content relating to what you can expect in the book. With the help of my sister, we did some posts in our “Ask the Historian Series,” where we navigated the thorny issues plaguing history today, in a way that we hope was clear-minded and helpful. I posted some reviews about what I was reading and watching. A project I hugely enjoyed was collaborating with Lance Elliott Wallace to produce a Q&A on Southern life and culture. And I started the year by releasing a Q&A and a series of “History Behind the Story” posts for Charleston Tides

As to the books, since that is what readers always have the most interest in…! We released Charleston Tides in February (I say we because it always feels like such a team effort, and I am grateful for all who help!). I finished Thank God for Mississippi this year, which will be published next year. I also completed drafts of two more books, one a historical novel set in 1840s Virginia, and the other a modern book, which is still fresh off the press, so more on that one later! The Monday after Thanksgiving, I made Southern Rain free on Kindle. This resulted in an entirely unexpected viral download that saw Southern Rain climb to #8 in Amazon’s Historical Fiction Kindle Store for a day. Of course, this was a boon for Southern Rain and the entire series, which has created a ripple effect that is still going on. I am fully cognizant of God’s provision and direction in the area of my writing as well, and I hope nothing I have said implies that any of this would have been possible without it. 

All in all, a crazy, busy year, but one which I will look back on with gratitude—for provision, for hope, for strength, for personal growth, for new beginnings, for small blessings, for family, for good books and good friends, for daily reminders of what it’s all about, and, not the least, for you, Readers.

Happy New Year.

Accents in TGFM

My next book is set in Middle Tennessee, which is where I’m from. I happened to think that Middle Tennessee is not often depicted in movies or shows, and that readers might like to know what we sound like! Of course, there are many different accents even in the region, so I have to do a bit of generalizing. Check out the audio below for an exploration of the accents you will hear in the book!

Coming in 2022!

Cover Reveal!

I’m so excited to share the cover of my next book, Thank God for Mississippi. It has it all: a porch, a rocking chair, ferns, and oh-so-Southern hydrangeas. It also has a bit of swirly font that reflects the (slight) chaos that ensues within the book. Without further ado, I give you the cover!


And here is the full print cover (front and back) for your perusal:


What do you think? Let me know here or on social media. And stop by again. We’ll have a release date soon!

Perspective – TGFM

Thank God for Mississippi is written in first person perspective—a totally new experiment for me! Since I have been writing for about twelve years, I have only ever written within the third person realm, sometimes with a bird’s eye view and sometimes within a character’s mind. But Mississippi simply refused to allow me not to allow her to tell her own story. Here is an audio I recorded explaining in a bit more detail the perspective in TGFM.